Thursday, January 26, 2017

Versatility, Reclaiming Space and Basic Pantry Building ~ Preparedness Series


"The Pantry.—A pantry is like a tea basket, or a handy box, or a ship's cabin. It is a small space containing a great variety of useful things. The one virtue necessary above all others in such a space is orderliness. Without it convenient compactness becomes crowded confusion.

Things not connected with pantry work should have a place found for them elsewhere. Things most frequently used should be on the shelves and in the drawers which require least reaching and stooping.

Things of the same kind should be grouped together except when this violates the previous rule. That is, for the sake of keeping all the platters together, it is not necessary to use precious space on the most practicable pantry shelf for a platter only used at Thanksgiving..."

~ Housekeeping by Elizabeth Hale Gilman (1916)


Welcome to the second installment of our Proverbs 31 Preparedness Series! I love building up my pantry for many reasons but the concept of preparedness has come into the limelight these past few years. Though one's first thought may be of natural disasters or a national crisis, the common everyday struggles of financial difficulty and/or health issues (which can hinder the home economy) is a more common scenario that is often over-looked. In any case, the food storage concepts we will be sharing will be a blessing during not only any potential "bad" times but also during any "good" or "lean" times. It is in essence the old-fashioned, simple, prudent homemaking that our ancestors have done for many a years. 


I don't think the benefits of having a well-stocked pantry need to be discussed for times of crisis. During the good times, a stocked pantry is pure convenience! No need for last minute grocery store runs and all the other particulars shared here. During those lean times, a pantry can carry you through many months without having the concern of a grocery bill or lack of food for your family.


And while I like the idea of having a generous supply of everything we use in our household, it is just not feasible (financially and space-wise). I remember reading once from an herbalist who said he wasn't interested in how many herbs you "knew" and can "prescribe" for certain ailments but how to have only a handful of herbs and know how to heal many ailments with them. This concept of versatility struck a chord and the wisdom of it resonated within my practical $ide. This will be the approach in our Proverbs 31 Preparedness series! I am interested in building up the "multi-tasking" pantry ingredients which can cover many areas.


For instance, a one-year supply of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) is very affordable and can double as a toothpaste, cleaning cleanser, all-purpose cleaner, heartburn reliever, laundry booster, bug-bite soother, drain cleaner, deodorizer and so forth. When you choose to store these certain bulk "key" ingredients that multitask and that you actually use, you are utilizing your space and income more efficiently. Now this relieves me of having to purchase 50 tubes of toothpaste (which can really add up!), antacids, cleaning products, etc. This also frees up precious shelf-space since I don't need to store so many separate products.


To give you an idea, you can get a 12-pound bag of baking soda for $7.95 on Walmart.com while the natural toothpaste sells for approx $4 per tube! One "prepper" website suggested purchasing 6 toothpastes per person in order to store a years worth. It is much more doable for me to purchase the baking soda and not bother with stocking additional toothpaste which is out of my budget. I know that if a crisis occurs, I have a back-up plan for many household items (in this case, I can easily brush my teeth with the multi-tasking baking soda)! This is an important concept I will be sharing in our preparedness series. The financial and practical aspect of it enables me to actually do something viable for our household and removes that overwhelmed feeling! I will have ample reserves and be able to fill many of the needs in our home by adopting this method. Perhaps this system will be a help to you?



"Purging your home of the stuff you don't want or don't use will give you the space you'll need for the equipment and goods that will sustain your family in a time of crisis. Tackle one room or space at a time. Pull everything out of the cabinets, drawers, and closets. Pay special attention to stored clothing, books, toys, sports equipment, and small electric gadgets and appliances, especially broken ones waiting to be fixed (someday). Be ruthless! If you haven't used it, fixed it, worn it, read it, or played with it in the last year, you probably don't really want it or need it. It's junk! Get rid of it!"

A secondary issue for many of us is storage and pantry space. While our multi-tasking pantry ingredients will certainly help out in this area, we still need to stock things like toilet paper, etc., which take up lots of space. I like what Kathy Harrison mentions in her book, Just in Case: How to Be Self-Sufficient When the Unexpected Happens (shared above)! We think we don't have space but yet we are storing small appliances we no longer use (aka juicers, cappuccino makers, panini presses, etc.). Perhaps you aren't ready to get rid of the popcorn popper just yet and that is fine (but you can learn to pop corn in your stockpot!). However, these types of items can be stored in the garage or anywhere else that is out of the way to make room for food supplies which require a more controlled temperature. Food should be given the star stage in the home while things like toiletries can be stored in less climate protected areas such as hot garages, attics, etc.


We personally don't have any closets in our home nor did we have a pantry. We did have a very small room that we converted into a pantry. My mother also didn't have a pantry in her kitchen but there was a closet in the hallway adjacent to her kitchen that we cleaned out. She rarely used anything stored in there! My husband cut up some thick plywood and fashioned "custom made" shelves which made a wonderful pantry.



Also, I shared these ideas earlier but they are worth mentioning again...  In our first home, we re-purposed an old-out-of-style-cast-off entertainment system that someone gave us (these can be found easily at thrift shops and garage sales). I removed all the modern hardware and doors, painted it white, added an inexpensive spring rod across the top and hung a dainty white curtain over it. The end result was a pleasant "French country" pantry for my kitchen! Using the same concept, book shelves can store bulk items and can be covered with a curtain as well. You can have a whole shelf unit across one wall which can be filled with your provisions. Just place a wire across with a hook and eye to the other side of the wall and hang a large curtain (or pretty flat sheets) across to completely hide the storage and give the room a clean, un-cluttered appearance (the curtain cover concept is shared in detail here). There are many other excellent storage options that one can utilize and I think Annabel's post on finding space shares everything else!



I also wanted to make mention to try and store as much food as you possibly can in your kitchen. It is a pantry in itself. I got rid of our toaster oven which took up too much space (we just make toast in our oven broiler) and keep just the basic necessities on our counter-tops. This leaves room for lots of large canisters that store flour, sugar, oatmeal, etc. We also fashioned shelves in an upper area in our kitchen where we keep Tupperware of dried beans, brown sugar, cornmeal, baking cocoa, quinoa, popcorn, more oatmeal, etc (instead of storing knick-knacks). Our "technical" pantry is just an overflow of our original one in the kitchen. Since we have little in the way of cabinets, we placed a few small shelves in the kitchen which store oils, vinegar and our daily smoothie ingredients. We keep them in pretty jars and bottles so that they are decorative at the same time. Attractive wire racks can be hung on the walls to hold your bulk spices, medicinal herbs and seasonings (just try and keep them away from light for best results).


Before I start sharing what foods that I will be purchasing in bulk and for what reasons, I also wanted to leave you with some of these basic ideas:
  • Store only what your family already eats. In the event you are blessed with forever good times, you will have only stored and bought what you already use and nothing is lost in the process. Otherwise, you may be trying to think of ways to make your family love those cases of pickled herrings you purchased on clearance because they were such a cheap source of protein! And you will also be struggling with how to cook with these foreign foods in the event of a crisis.
  • Make it a goal to add at least one thing to your pantry each week. Garden produce and foraged foods that you preserve or dehydrate count too! It doesn't mean you always need to spend money to do so.
  • Practice food rotation. Try and put a date on everything you buy in bulk or at least place the older items up front so they are used first. Place the newer items in the back to keep your inventory fresh.
  • Learn how to cook from your food storage/pantry. In the event of a crisis (or even a I don't know what to make for dinner moment!), you will have a repertoire of already tried and true recipes that you can rely on. We will be going into more detail on this in the future posts as I share each bulk item we will be storing. I am hoping to include recipe pages to use those items from the pantry for a Food Storage Cookbook. I'd like to include it as a chapter in our Preparedness Binders. Depression era recipes are gold for this reason as many of them don't require butter, cheese, milk or eggs!
Do any of you ladies have anything to add on these subjects? I am in no way a professional in this area, just a homemaker trying her best for her family.
Your homework for the week:
  • Purge! Go through your home and remove any dust-collectors, un-used appliances and other odds and ends that are taking up valuable real estate. If you aren't ready to part with them yet, you can always put them in a box labeled "garage sale" along with the date. If you find that you have lived without these items in one year, feel at peace to sell them or donate them. 
Extra Credit:
  • Look into your pantry and start experimenting! Do you have any recipes that can be made strictly from what you store there (which doesn't include fresh items from the refrigerator)?
All the fine print. This post may be shared with some or all of the following link-ups: The Art of Home-Making MondaysModest Mom Monday'sMonday's MusingsMake Your Home Sing MondayGood Morning Mondays,  The Scoop, Tuesdays with a TwistRaising HomemakersThe Homesteader HopWise Woman Link UpHomestead Blog Hop Wow Us Wednesdays,  Coffee and ConversationHomemaking ThursdaysHome Sweet HomeOur Simple HomesteadAwesome Life Friday Link UpFive Star Frou Frou Friday, and Shabbilicious Friday. Thank you lovely ladies for hosting these. This post may contain affiliate links (which are merchant links that help to support this site at no additional cost to you if you purchase an item through them). 



47 comments:

  1. I'm very interested in this and want to do this for my family. And your shelves look vast and beautiful. But I can't imagine that, at least in our household, much of that food would go stale, old, and bad before we could get to it. How do you use up all of this (asking because I'm cheap and would hate to throw out food!)? Any tips you throw out here for those of use learning would be most welcome!

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    1. Hi there! First off, I cook from scratch for every meal so the ingredients go fast! :) Also, the canned goods will all last at least a year. The dry ingredients have a shelf life from 6 months - 2 years depending on the item so there is plenty of time to use everything before they go bad. I also detest waste but a properly prepared pantry does have a good shelf life. That is the beauty in it! Here is a post that may be helpful regarding shelf life basics:

      http://strangersandpilgrimsonearth.blogspot.com/2013/04/buying-in-bulk-and-shelf-life-basics.html

      Hope this helps! :)

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  2. JES, I loved what the herbalist said... it is so true. I am also looking forward to this series... as we just moved into an apartment and space is very limited.

    I want to plan well...

    Blessings & Shalom!

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    1. I understand Andi. I have also been there! Thank you for visiting! :)

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  3. These are all such wonderful ideas for use for a preparedness pantry. I try to buy bulk when I can and we have 2 large areas for food storage, I have been working on the purging of linen closets since this is what we have instead of closets. I'm trying to learn about what herbs to plant this year that will be beneficial for spices and for medicinal purposes. We can and dehydrate almost all year, especially when fruits and veggies are cheap. I'm not at all considered a prepper either, but I like to know my family is prepared for anything...
    Thanks for posting this!!
    Have a delightful weekend!

    Hugs, Amy

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    1. Wow, looks like you are making great progress! It is nice to hear from you Amy! Happy purging :)

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  4. My pantry looks nothing like yours.
    Merle..............

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  5. I am so excited for this series! Where we live we have to stock up and put up for 6 months at a time - shopping (except for a very expensive grocery store that is 33 miles away) is 250 miles away. I love my pantry that is right off the kitchen. I will see how I can declutter it starting tomorrow! Thank you!

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    1. Wow Carol! With that lifestyle I am sure you have much to offer us! Please share any ideas you have along the way! Happy de-cluttering! :)

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  6. What a great post! Thank you for all of these tips! -Marci @ Stone Cottage Adventures

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  7. I'm also looking forward to this series. I especially love the idea of other uses for everything (baking soda). Thanks for the wonderful suggestions!

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    1. Excellent! I think it makes it more doable, doesn't it!?

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  8. You're speaking my language:) What wonderful info & a beautiful pantry.

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    1. For some reason I thought so! :) And thank you!

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  9. Dear JES,
    Thank you for such an excellent post! Having a well-stocked pantry is really a job in itself, and one that I enjoy. Your pantry is so organized and I love seeing all of your home-canned goodies. I do have a question for you. I have noticed in some of your canning posts that your jars don't always have the traditional lid and ring. What are the solid white lids on some of your jars? I have never seen them and was wondering if you could tell me a bit about them :)
    One of my pantry goals this year is to make more homemade mixes. With our first baby due in July (an answered prayer after six years!), I want to make things as convenient as possible without sacrifices to our health and budget. I am reading through some of the ebooks I purchased in the Back to Basics bundle, and they are just what I need right now! I am looking forward to your upcoming posts in this series, as well. I like the fact that you are dealing with basic ingredients! Have a lovely day!
    With love, Kelsey

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    1. Hi Kelsey, First off, I am so excited for your family!!! I bet you are just bursting with love! :) May God grant you and baby a safe and healthy delivery! Secondly, that is funny you asked about the jars! I have a post ready to go out about them in a week or so. If you can wait, all the information will be there. Regarding the mixes, those are my favorite hobby right now too. It is so convenient to have and they take only minutes to make (I plan on adding some to our pantry series based off our food storage supply too)! I do hope you try our oatmeal muffin in a jar mix as those are very healthy and seem to be liked by many species :) I am glad you are enjoying the Bundle. I too have been reading through and getting all sorts of ideas. So much planning and so little time! It was very nice hearing from you. Have a lovely weekend!

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  10. Another great series, Jes! I love baking soda too but never thought to buy it bulk, why I don't know. I use it for everything!I also use a very tiny bit of it in a glass of water and wash my hair with it every day. I don't think I could brush my teeth with it though, I hate the taste! Lol! I would use all my coconut oil first mixed with a little black walnut powder and peppermint oil. I guess I better toughen up. Looking forward to the rest of this series!

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    1. At least you are honest! :) Actually, brushing with baking soda would be a back-up plan and when I do get to that part, I was going to share that if you had the provisions, you could make a more desirable paste with a mixture of baking soda, coconut oil and a few drops of minty fresh essential oil. So now you are saved! :) Thanks for taking the time to comment today my old friend!

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  11. Am so happy for Kelsey, how wonderful after 6 yrs.to be having a baby, how exciting.
    Due to what is happening in our govt.am feeling we all had better be prepared just in case. How wonderful of you to prepare all this and then share it with your readers.
    Don't know about you but there is no way we can afford to buy enuf food for a year. Due to cost of so many items it's all we can do to feed ourselves for five weeks between paydays. We make several one pot meals and have for long time which usually feeds us about 3 meals out of each pot.
    Where we live isn't an inexpensive area so we've had to learn even more how to make do than we did before. So many people here seem to think money grows on trees,, especially younger, in 20's/30's. We drive a 9 yr. old car which is paid for, not fancy but is ours which we take good care of.
    I was raised by depression era parents so learned at young age not everybody has lots of money and better make do with everything we have. My hubs is 75 and I am 76. Our daughter will often ask me how long have had particular piece of clothing. As was taught make god use of things, make some of my own and use item even after has served it's purpose. We buy most of our clothing at thrift stores, nothing wrong with them.
    Thank you so much for preparing this series, will be well appreciated.
    Enjoy your weekend. Hope you are doing well after your surgery.

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    1. Hi there! And thank you for sharing! Our lifestyle is very similar! :) Though I didn't have Depression Era parents, I lived with a great aunt who survived it and boy did I learn the art of not wasting food! I do hope you continue to share your insight along the way-- so far, this is a great start. Thank you!

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  12. I just love looking at your pantry photos. Mine is... um, not as organized, but it's stocked pretty well. I learned to cook from scratch (ages ago) and love having all the basics ready for whatever I want to make. Can't wait to read more on this subject.

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    1. Thanks! My pantry is sort of a hobby which is why it is kept up :) And I must agree, cooking from scratch is a big part in this whole preparedness business. Knowing how to take various pantry components to make a meal is an art in itself! Thanks for sharing!

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  13. Hi JES,
    I absolutely love your pantry and jar pictures! You have done such a beautiful job and it's very inspiring. This is my cup of tea. There is just something so pretty seeing your food items stored/displayed this way and practical, because I can see what I have or need quickly.
    I love your labels too. :)
    I've actually started to purge and reorganize, motivated by your last preparedness post! Will be purging some more.
    Thank you and God bless!
    ~Yvette

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    1. Looks like you are on your way Yvette! And I am glad you like the labels! They are all shared on the blog for your use if you like! Just visit here for the cottage rose style:

      http://strangersandpilgrimsonearth.blogspot.com/2016/04/cottage-rose-pantry-labels-by-mrs.html

      and here for the Antique French collection:

      http://strangersandpilgrimsonearth.blogspot.com/2013/04/printable-pantry-labels-expanded.html

      Have a lovely week!

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  14. Hi, I am enjoying your series and looking forward to learning more. I'm interested in learning how to stock the pantry...currently I can keep ours stocked for 2-3 weeks and then my shelves are empty. I don't have an excess to spend much beyond that, but I do see the wisdom in stocking up. I suppose the goal would be to not eat the surplus, like do you keep your everyday cooking pantry items separate than your items purchased for a "just in case" pantry? I have recently started slowly adding to a supply of water, as our town experiences water boil alerts once or twice a year. But to try to set aside, say at a minimum, a month's worth of extra pantry supplies feels overwhelming, especially when we are out of this or that for the present moment, and then I start thinking about not just food, but household items and nessecities that I know we would also need. Does one just make the decision to invest and put it all up and away at once? How do you decide which items take priority when you have to go slow? Is it something you decide with your husband?

    I do so enjoy your lovely blog, thanks!
    Amy

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    1. Hi Amy, I am in a similar boat as you! And I am truly not an expert. I prepared a game plan and I will be setting it into motion -- I am writing this series to keep myself accountable! I am hoping to add one extra reserve each month (and carefully chosen for its shelf stable-ness and inexpensive price). I am hoping that after 6 months, my storage will show an increase and my pocketbook won't be empty)... but I will share all this along the way and I hope it is helpful! Each baby step will add up! Stay tuned! :)

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    2. Amy, I try to purchase one or two items each time I go to the store: one extra jar of coconut oil, a box of baking soda. Or when I need something, buy two and put one away. Each year, I get a bit of extra money, areound Christmas time, and I use this to buy extras of the things I need to stock up on. Believe it or not, using this method, I have put away around 30 packages of 18 rolls of toilet paper, 20-30 boxes of baking powder, and much more. I'm not living paycheck to paycheck, but I have very little extra money, so I'm not doing this with loads of extra money, either. If I can do it, so can you.
      Carol L

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  15. Such good tips there, Jes. I wish the internet had been around when I first married as young girls these days have so much good advice at the click of a mouse. You are very generous with sharing the knowledge you have.

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    1. Thanks! But the truth is, this series is helping to keep myself accountable. I have been wanting to do something like this for years but am finally forcing myself to be more aggressive! :) Thanks for stopping by!

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  16. Hi Jes, I'm looking forward to your preparedness posts (along with Annabel's) and thought I would share a couple ideas. When we moved into our current home there were two "coat" closets. One by the front door and one just off the kitchen/laundry room. Our kitchen is very small with limited cupboard space, and needing more pantry shelves was very important to us. So, with the closet closest to the kitchen we took the coat rod out and added 5 shelves. The kitchen also had a small closet (used for a pantry), plus one other closet close to the laundry room (which had shelves). So, this was a way to store extras of food plus all our big buckets, roasters and various sizes of cake and bread pans, etc. I have since re-evaluated all of these areas and use them to only "house" the things we use daily/regularly. By making the "coat" closet into a food pantry certainly helped since we can much of our food and dehydrate as much as possible. We use our food storage daily, cooking from scratch, and rotating. Also, we purchased an over the door metal shelf to hold jars and extra food. This extended the amount of storage in each closet. We do use our basement for all the bottles of food we can and dehydrate.(we just bring up a small amount to the kitchen at one time). It's a more controlled temp. plus we can store our non-food items, empty jars and extra water down there.

    I must say that your pantry is beautiful (labels, jars, containers, etc.) as is Annabels. It never occurred to me to make fancy labels (I've always used masking tape lol)! I've always used odd sized jars for my dried foods or I've used canning jars that are "special" to me and wouldn't put in a canner. :)

    Also, I just wanted to tell Kelsey that homemade mixes are so nice to have on your pantry shelves. I store lots of mine in used #10 cans or big plastic containers (similar to your Tupperware containers). I use my SOS (soup or sauce) dry mix all the time. There's a link on Annabel's blog (the Bluebirds are Nesting). I'm looking forward to more of your dry mixes, Jes, and really enjoy your gentle way of teaching!

    And since our pantry, like yours and others, is used daily, I'm looking forward to your teachings, Jes! I feel like Nanna Chel. I didn't have the internet to use when we were raising our family but I did have the county extension service that provided lots of help. I have always cooked from scratch and wanted to find ways to make my own mixes, cleaners and learn new skills.

    Thanks again, Jes. Teri S

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    1. Hi Teri, Thank you so much for sharing all your excellent ideas! What you did with your closet space is exactly what we did for my mother and it is wonderful! One only needs so many coats!!! :) I also use our "special" jars for dehydrated goods and herbs. Some are from my grandmother and have beautiful ridges in them and I fear breaking them in the canner too! I appreciate all you share! I am certainly not an expert but consider this not only a homemaking duty but a hobby and so I enjoy tinkering with ideas and spending extra minutes brainstorming these kinds of things for fun (and also for convenience). Cooking from scratch requires a lot of time and any way you can save it is wonderful (such as the mixes you mention)! I will look into your SOS mix! Looking forward to your input along the way! Happy homemaking, love, JES

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  17. Oh, JES, what a pleasure to visit your blog again after such a long time! I love seeing your beautiful shelves of supplies and reading your helpful post. I am currently trying to organize and simplify my supply of herbs and spices, specifically. Some are organized, but some are in Amish store containers, some in sturdy bags from purchasing online, some in jars (especially the stuff from my garden)... and more. I use all of this for cooking, health needs and more... it is a massive undertaking w/ all that I have.... but fun too, when I figure out exactly how I want to make it work. :) Thank you for the inspiration. It is so good to be back after so long away. :)

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    1. So nice to hear from you Joy -- I hope you are doing well! Those are the homemaking projects that I relish! Enjoy organizing and beautifying all those goodies! :)

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  18. You've got me thinking about what I CAN do, Jes. You know we've had to eat out of our stored food before! Unemployment can strike anyone.
    Blessings,
    Laura of Harvest Lane Cottage

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    1. Very sober reminder! Thank you for sharing Laura!

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  19. Lots of great, informative information here! Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Glad it is helpful! Thank you for taking the time to comment! :)

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  20. Hi Jes!
    I always try to add at least 1 item a week to the larder even if it's just a sample of something. Store what you eat and eat what you store. If you go back through Annabel's posts from Oct. 2015 there is a post about when it's hard to get ahead that may have some helpful tips. And I think building a pantry too. Also baking soda helps rid the body of radiation which is why a lot "preppers" have it in their stockpiles. I love this series and am looking forward to all you post!
    XOXO
    Vicky

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    1. Hi Vicky, Thanks for your valuable input! I did not realize that about baking soda! One more added benefit of bulk storage that I will include when I write up that post. If you come across Annabel's post on helpful tips when it's hard to get ahead, drop by the link and I will include it in this post! Thanks so much for sharing!

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  21. Hi Jes, several days ago, I wrote a comment on this post. I'm wondering if it was "lost" or maybe I said something wrong? I'm not sure what happens but I did check the "notify me" button and have been getting everyone else's comments. I'm just curious! :)

    I love your pantry pictures and will be following your posts along with Annabel at the Bluebirds are Nesting. Also, Connie at Frugal Living on the Ranch has some great information on pantries.

    Have a wonderful week! Teri S

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    1. Hi Teri! I am so glad you sent through a check up comment! For some reason, I found the first one in the spam box! :( I have dug you out with love and have published the first comment. So sorry about that! I am thrilled to have you join us! :)

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  22. Ah! I love love love love love your blog! You got me into preparedness and pantry storage and in the next few months we're finally going to be taking the plunge! I can't wait! Any tips for food storage containers on the cheap? Yours are so pretty and organized! Can't wait to see you on the Raising Homemakers Link Up again!

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    1. Hi Amanda, your plan sounds like a good one! Here are some helps for "containers on the cheap" :)

      http://strangersandpilgrimsonearth.blogspot.com/2013/10/prudent-pantry-ideas-prepare-your-own.html

      Enjoy!

      Love,
      JES

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