Saturday, June 2, 2012

Freezing Extra Eggs


Extra eggs on a farm can be a blessing but they can also be overwhelming if they exceed the amount needed for your family. We have 36 chickens and a family not even half the size of the Duggars. Aside from giving them to family, friends and those in need, what I have also found beneficial is to freeze the excess for the future when your chickens aren't producing much (because of molting, etc.). They come in handy when you are doing a lot of baking and best of all, it is really simple to do.


I like to freeze them in containers consisting of two egg and four egg batches since most of my recipes call for those amounts (chocolate chip cookies when doubled requires four and that is a staple in our healthy home *wink*). There are a variety of ways in which you can freeze them but I will share my method. 

  • Break the amount of eggs you want to freeze per container into a bowl. Slowly stir the yolk and white together (until just combined), trying not to whip in a lot of air.
  • For every two eggs, stir in 1/4 tsp. sugar or honey to help maintain the quality of the eggs when frozen. Obviously the sweet additive makes this appropriate for baking use. If you want to freeze for the use of cooking, then add 1/4 tsp. salt for every two eggs (make sure you label them accordingly).

Make sure to allow some space from the top of the container because when it freezes it will expand which can break your container or at least pop off the lid. Label each container with the amount of eggs inside and its purpose (meaning cooking verses baking which will depend on the mixture having a sweet additive instead of a salty one).


It is also helpful to place the date on the container. What is wonderful is that these will last up to one year in the freezer which takes you through all the seasons in your life in which an extra set of eggs would be useful. 

To thaw, place them overnight in the refrigerator or place in a bowl (while in its container) of cool water to expedite the process.

Notes:
  • You can also freeze a larger container of eggs in the same way (just make sure to add 1/2 tsp. honey, salt or sugar per one cup of eggs). Substitute three tablespoons of thawed egg mixture per one large fresh egg in recipes.
  • It is not desirable to freeze hard boiled eggs since they turn rubbery.
  • You cannot freeze the complete egg with shell in the freezer as the shell will burst open when it expands.
  • The thawed eggs from the freezer will last for three days in the refrigerator so take out just enough for your needs (which is why I prefer the smaller batches for specific recipes of two and four eggs).
  • Safety tip: Use thawed eggs in dishes that will be thoroughly cooked.
  • See Farm Fresh Eggs for more information about eggs.

Some wit and wisdom on the subject from an old friend...

"Put all your eggs in one basket and -- watch that basket!"
~ Mark Twain



21 comments:

  1. This was certainly educational, as I was not even aware that you could freeze eggs properly where they would be safe to eat later. I might try this once just to see how it works. :)

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    1. Yes, I wouldn't have thought of looking into it until I had about 6 dozen of them staring at me :) Just made some choc chip cookies with them and they were as tasty as ever.

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  2. I know that there is a one year recommended life on most frozen produce. To be honest if your foods are good to start with and the freezer works continually, the loss of quality is minimal. I found a batch of frozen eggs, prepared just as you describe, forgotten in the bottom of my freezer, that were three years old. I thawed them and used them in baking and they were just fine. As for savoury uses, I put an egg or two into meatloaf, and egg noodles might be another.

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    1. To be honest, I don't fall much into the worry category about freezer time as long as the items look "normal" but I put the shelf life on there for the quality for those who may be more concerned. As for the meat loaf idea, EXCELLENT! I did not think of that!!! Thank you for stopping by as your hints are very helpful! :)

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  3. What a great idea. I've heard of freezing eggs before but never done it. I especially like that you freeze them in 2 egg portions.

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  4. Thanks for the great tips and for stoppin' by CountryMommaCooks and sharing : )

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  5. thank you for sharing this will b sure to share with my friends this is a great tip come see what I shared at http://shopannies.blogspot.com/2012/06/caprese-skewers.html

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  6. This is a great tip. Thanks for sharing!

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  7. I am featuring you at tonights link and greet party @ CountryMommaCooks......stop by and grab a button : )

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  8. Such a good idea, I linked you in my blogpost today. Greetings, Annemieke

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  9. I just found this post and it is perfect for us. We are getting about 2 dozen eggs a day and can't eat them all. I was just saying to my daughter yesterday, that you can freeze all kinds of meat except eggs, and here it is!
    My question, can I freeze them in ziploc freezer bags because I don't have those nice little containers?
    Or would you use mason jars as I have a lot of those, too.
    I would love to hear from you.
    Thanks,
    Gloria

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    1. Hi Gloria :)

      Ziplock bags would work out great too! Or any old/clean cottage cheese containers and such. You could use jars but keep in mind to leave an inch or so head space from the top so the jar doesn't explode when the egg expands. I am not a lover of jars in the freezer because I fear breakage when rummaging through but it is totally fine too! Hope this helps!

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  10. Thank you!! I'll get right on it! :)

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    1. Awesome :) Because there are times when the chickens are molting and you won't get much eggs. They will come in handy or for heavy baking... Happy freezing!

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  11. You're so organized! I was freezing mine a bit differently. I cracked one egg per square in the ice cube tray. A few were bigger and took up 2 squares. I put it in the freezer and removed once frozen. I then popped them out and put in freezer bag. I figured I can just pick out as many cubes as I needed per recipe. What do you think of freezing them without mixing them first? I have yet to bake with them. Freezing eggs is totally new for me!

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    1. Hi there! Your method using the ice-cube trays is smart but to be honest, I have never tried to NOT stir the two together. Everywhere I have read in the past mentions to stir first. You can do the stirring method and then pour into ice-cube trays. If approx 3 TBS is in one cubicle, then that can stand for 1 large egg in a recipe. If it only fits 2 1/2 TBS, perhaps 1 medium egg? Hope this makes sense.
      P.S. Let me know how they bake using your method… I do love easier if possible :)

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  12. I love this and just may have to get some laying hens again ;) Our children sold them to the families around the farm, so we didn't ever have to do this. thank you for all these really handy tips, JES.

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    1. We used to have an "egg route" as well :) However, hubby tends to love to have more than enough in the way of chickens for some reason :)

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